Aaniin ~ Welcome - Curve Lake First Nation Territory

TOURISM & CULTURE

Pow wow

Our First Nation is visited by some 80,000 to 100,000 friends, family, business travelers and tourists annually. There is a variety of things to do and see while in Curve Lake from visiting with local artists and crafts people at the Whetung’s Art Gallery and Craft Shop to a shoreline dinner with a local fishing guide. Of all surrounding First Nations, Curve Lake is the only one to operate a full time Cultural Centre. Visitors to our community are more than welcome to come and share in what our First Nation has to offer. This includes:

Cultural Centre

Curve Lake First Nation has one of the only First Nation owned and operated Cultural Centres in Ontario. The Cultural Centre is open year round and offers various collections and exhibits, educational and cultural sensitivity workshops, and archiving. Cultural Centre staff work closely with the Elders Advisory Committee to ensure traditions, ceremonies and language continue to be passed down from generation to generation. For more information, please see the Cultural Centre section.

Accommodations

Curve Lake First Nation has 2 rental cottages available from 1st weekend in May through to Thanksgiving weekend. There is one cottage on small peninsula on Upper Buckhorn Lake and the one cottage located in a nice quiet bay on Chemong Lake. Please see Cottage Rentals section for more information.

Local Businesses

Parks and Trails

  • Henrys Gamiing Park
  • Lance Wood Park
  • Marshland Boardwalk - Henry’s Gamiing Park
  • Walking Trail - connects Henry’s Gamiing Park to Lance Wood Park

Community Events/Activities

  • Aboriginal Day Celebrations – June 21st every year
  • Cultural Day Activities
  • Remembrance Day – November 11th every year
  • Family Day Activities
  • Community Easter Gathering
  • Community Halloween Party
  • Annual Curve Lake Pow Wow - Third weekend in September

Our members would like to remind visitors to be respectful of our First Nation including obeying the local speed limits and refraining from littering.

Curve Lake Pow Wow

Pow wow

At Pow Wows we gather in a circle. In a circle, no one is higher than anyone else, everyone is equal. Our dancers move in a circle, searching the ground for the footprints of our ancestors in order to follow their ways. The drum beats out the solemn rhythm of all creation. It is the sound we remember from before we were born. It is the rhythm of our mothers' heartbeat. The drums summon up a memory that is common to us all.

Pow Wow means gathering, or celebration.

Traditionally, families had to scatter far and wide to be able to find enough game to feed themselves throughout the long and harsh Canadian winter. The Pow Wow took place each year when families and friends were reunited to dance, drum, feast and give thanks to the Creator. Each community had its own time for gathering - Spring, Summer, Winter or Fall. At Curve Lake we still hold and annual Pow Wow, bringing together Natives and non-Natives, to honour our ancestors and uphold this sacred tradition.

Every year, the end of the summer here brings with it the annual Curve Lake Pow Wow.

This celebration consists of two days of dancing, contests and presentations, to re-establish old friendships and meet new people, with many vendors and performers in attendance. As every year, all of our neighbors from the surrounding towns are welcome to join us in most of the festivities.

Come join us and enjoy traditional foods, dances, songs and stories!

Never been to a Pow Wow?

Pow Wow Tips

  • During Grand Entry, everyone stands as the Eagle Staff, the flags and the dancers enter. The Master of Ceremonies will announce other events that require standing as a gesture of respect.
  • Consider the privacy of the participants. Ask permission before you photograph or record people. This includes the spectators and craftspeople as well as the dancers and singers.
  • Certain dances and ceremonies are not to be recorded or photographed. The Master of Ceremonies will announce when such activities are not allowed.
  • Do not touch the dancers' regalia. These have special meanings and the handmade regalia, which can cost thousands of dollars, are cherished and often made by a respected family members.
  • Feel free to join in the intertribal dancing. The Master of Ceremonies will announce these dances and invite all to join.
  • No drugs or alcohol are allowed at Powwows.
  • Pets are not permitted on the Powwow grounds.
  • Remember to bring your lawn chairs, sun block and a good appetite. See you there!